21 entries, filtered by: MEMS
Published: September 2007

Using silicon-based MEMS technologies, the cost-efficient production of gyroscopes has become possible in recent years. As a result, gyroscopes are entering new markets, such as for highly accurate GPS-Instruments where the gyroscope enhances accuracy in situations where satellite reception is lost, for example in tunnels. However, since all gyroscopes are very precise resonating measurement devices, this leads to stringent wafer processing requirements for their production.


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Published: March 2007

MEMS, such as surface micromachined inertial sensors, require cap wafer bonding to protect the sensitive structures at the wafer level against mechanical damage and environmental influences, in order to allow the finalization of the wafer processing, dicing and packaging. In most cases, the cap is solely for mechanical protection without any electrical function, because standard wafer bonding processes cannot provide the possibility of local electrical contacts from system to cap wafer (glass frit, adhesive and low temperature direct bonding are nonconductive, while the metal interlayer bonding bond frame is a large, dominating contact area).


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Published: October 2006

Wafer bonding is an essential process step in the development and production of MEMS devices because it allows the possibility of realizing real three dimensional structures, such as functional capping of free movable structures. Because this process step is so important, it has to fit suitably into an industrial wafer-processing flow, so that wafer bonding can be performed very reproducibly with high process stability and at low cost.


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Published: September 2006

An infrared focal plane array with 16 x 8 pixels is presented. The not-cooled thermopile sensor array has been completely fabricated in CMOS technology. The main field of application of this sensor is to detect the presence of persons in buildings by their own thermal radiation. For a wide spread use of this sensor a low cost production with established CMOS technologies is necessary. The chip embraces the sensor pixels and highly integrated electronic circuits to allow a simple sensor interfacing.


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Published: April 2006

In the paper new testing methods for MEMS will be presented that can be applied on wafer level in early stage of the manufacturing process. First measurements of the eigenfrequencies test specimen were done. A Finite Element model was created to determine the plate thickness for the measured eigenfrequencies. There is a good agreement between the microscopic determined real thicknesses and the calculated thicknesses. Also a stochastic model was created to describe the influence of different parameters on the calculated thickness of membrane.


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Published: April 2006

A wafer-level testing method is investigated for an early stage of the manufacturing process applied to accelerometers. The approach consists of performing optical measurement of the modal responses of the MEMS structures, and uses this information in an inverse identification algorithm based on a FE model.


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Published: October 2005

In this paper a non-destructive test structure for monitoring the strength of anodic bonded glass silicon wafer compounds is introduced. The realisation of the structure, the calculation of the surface energy using FEM and practical results are shown.


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Published: September 2005

This paper presents the results of a three and a half year R&D project for low cost micromachined gyroscopes. As starting point of this work the application requirements of enhanced automotive applications such as Advanced Driving Assistant Systems (ADAS) are given. Based on these demands the sensor development is carried out.


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Published: May 2004

This paper reports on glass frit wafer bonding, which is a universally usable technology for wafer level encapsulation and packaging. After explaining the principle and the process flow of glass frit bonding, experimental results are shown. Glass frit bonding technology enables bonding of surface materials commonly used in MEMS technology. It allows hermetic sealing and a high process yield. Metal lead throughs at the bond interface are possible, because of the planarizing glass interlayer. Examples of surface micromachined sensors demonstrate the potential of glass–frit bonding.


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Published: October 2003

The importance of surface micromachining processes has increased over the last few years. After the fundamental problems of these technologies have been solved in research institutes, surface micromachined components now arrive in industrial production, e.g. inertial sensors for automotive applications. In comparison to the classical bulk micromachined components, technologies based on surface micromachining provide a wide range of advantages.


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