30 entries, filtered by: More than Moore
Published: January 2011

Visualization is still the most important tool in medical diagnostics to allow for the physician, in combination with their medical knowledge, to detect diseases within the human body and choose healing treatments in order to enable recovery. For minimal invasive surgical operations that use endoscopic tools, imaging camera modules that have both a small volume and a good resolution are necessary to ensure the success of the surgical treatment.
Microsystem technologies now allow for the direct integration of imaging optics and sensors in a system.


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Published: January 2011

Miniaturized video endoscopes with an imager located at the distal end and a simplified opto-mechanical layout are presented. They are based on a CMOS imager with 650 x 650 pixels of 2.8 μm pitch and provide straight view with 75° and 110° field of view at f/4.3. They have an outer diameter of 3 mm including the shell and a length of approx. 8 mm. The optics consist of polymer lenses in combination with a GRIN and a dispensed lens. Using a simple flip chip assembly, optical axis alignment better than 10 μm and a contrast of 30 % at 90 LP/mm was achieved. The 75° FOV system was sealed at the front window using a solderjetting technology, providing 10-9 mbar*l/s leakage rates even after several autoclave cycles.


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Published: December 2010

This free webinar introduces X-FAB’s Hall effect sensor device that detects and measures magnetic fields directly on the chip, making magnetic field-sensing design much faster. You’ll learn how the Hall sensor element – available as a completely characterized building block in X-FAB’s 0.18 micrometer modular high-voltage technology, XH018 – can be combined with other features of the XH018 process to enable a broad range of applications. For example, contactless detection or measurement of magnetic fields, and applications in which a magnetic field is used for indirect measurement of distance, position, rotational angle, speed or an electric current.


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Published: April 2010

The exponential growth of opto-electronic applications such as digital cameras and mobile phones during the past few years has followed the same Moore’s Law scenario as memories and digital gates did in the past. These low-cost, high-volume applications require highly specialized fabs and processes to achieve the lower node size that allows for higher pixel count and higher resolution. Moore’s Law works very well for these high-volume applications. However, it falls short for several other applications that require the integration of various opto-sensitive components. These applications might have varying technical requirements for sensitivity, supported wavelength, noise and bandwidth; and commercial volume requirements spanning from low to high. In addition, many Silicon on Chip (SoC) solutions also require multiple analog functions, including opto-electronic sensors. Highly specialized fabs that follow Moore’s Law simply lack the flexibility to support all of these different requirements.


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Published: March 2010

For the first time, this paper demonstrates the experimental results for two types of test structures of field transistors up to 200°C. The field transistor structures which are stripe (conventional) and square ring (new) structures were measured and investigated in term of field leakage current and onstate characterization at high temperature.


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Published: March 2010

Sub-wavelength structures in metal films have interesting optical properties that can be implemented for sensing applications: gratings act as wire grid polarizer, hole arrays with enhanced transmission can be used as spectral filters. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of these nanostructures using 180 nm and 90 nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processes. The metal layers of the process can be used for optical nanostructures with feature sizes down to 100 nm.


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Published: October 2009

X-FAB steps beyond logic and memory scaling to deliver “More than Moore” value for customers. Instead of following Moore’s Law, X-FAB integrates technology features that interact with the analog world, and provides a comprehensive design ecosystem. It includes services and tools for developing diversified power/HV, MEMS, opto and analog products; a 24-hour technical hotline service; a portfolio of technically mature, extensive libraries and IP; a broad spectrum of primitive devices; and flexible prototyping options – all backed by X-FAB’s 15 years of solid analog/mixed-signal foundry expertise.


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Published: August 2009

One time programmable (OTP) electrically programmed read only memory (EPROM) become a simple low cost solution in non-volatile memory (NVM) to be integrated in variety of CMOS baseline technology node platforms without extra masks or additional process cost incur. The feasibility of EPROM floating gate built on buried channel pMOSFET was explored experimentally. The buried channel device physic fundamental characteristics would lead to consistently high erased cell current (Ioff) in μA level instead of expected pA level for EPROM cell in erased state. Alternative external voltage biasing could not be applied due to unavailability of floating gate terminal connection to control the buried channel onoff state.


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Published: August 2009

OLED-on-CMOS micro-displays are widely studied in the recent years due to the fast development of OLED. However, there are some challenges to fabricate the electrodes of OLED. In this study, the process challenges are discussed, and the surface roughness is suggested to be one of the critical parameters.


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Published: July 2008

In 0.11um and larger technology node non-volatile memory process integration, undesired cobalt salicide residue formation is found to degrade ohmic contact resistant and cause severe yield loss. TiN/Ti/Co stack is applied in the process to get good CoSi2 formation. The abnormal salicide residue formation is detected after cobalt stripping process which is applying a two step selective wet etching.


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